quinta-feira, 23 de março de 2017

[From Technet] Five reasons to run SQL Server 2016 on Windows Server 2016 — No. 1: Security

This is the first blog in a five-part series. Keep an eye out for upcoming posts, which will cover cutting costs and improving performance of storage, BI, and analytics; improving uptime and reliability; reaching data insights faster by running analytics at the point of creation; and maintaining a consistent data environment across on-premises, hybrid, and cloud environments.

Wall, ditch, moat, palisades, watch towers, guards, highly trained soldiers: Even 2,000 years ago, when the Romans built their defenses, they deployed multiple layers of protection to deter invaders and keep intruders out. Today, on the electronic front, IT environments demand no less than a strong, layered approach to ensuring that data assets are protected from attacks such as stolen administrator credentials, unauthorized access, and pass-the-hash exploits.

You can see how important security is by examining the cost of data breaches, which is growing rapidly and represents a significant risk to business, as Figure 1 illustrates. To address this, Microsoft’s $1 billion annual investment in security demonstrates the company’s longstanding and proven commitment to building security capabilities into both its applications and operating systems. This means you can take advantage of layered security and mitigate risk.

Figure 1: Growing cost of data breach [1]

figure-1

Consider SQL Server 2016 and Windows Server 2016, for example: Security is built into both. In fact, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has shown SQL Server to consistently be the least vulnerable database.[2] Underpinning the built-in security you get with SQL Server, Windows Server 2016 adds new OS-level security capabilities to existing security functionality. As a result, if you use both SQL Server 2016 and Windows Server 2016 together, you get enterprise-scale security that meets the strictest organizational and industry standards for your infrastructure and your data.

Figure 2: Independent findings show unparalleled security

figure-2[3]

SQL Server 2016 security

When you modernize your data platform to SQL Server 2016, you get access to innovative advanced security features of the least vulnerable database.[4] Three key built-in features that keep unauthorized users from accessing SQL Server data are:

  • Always Encrypted enables encryption inside client applications without revealing encryption keys to SQL Server. It allows changes to encrypted data without the need to decrypt it first, as shown in Figure 3. The combination of Transparent Data Encryption and Always Encrypted ensures that data is encrypted both at rest and in motion. (To learn more, see “Always Encrypted in SQL Server & Azure SQL Database.”)

Figure 3: Always Encrypted protection

figure-3

  • Row-Level Security (RLS), which Figure 4 illustrates, enables developers to centralize row-level access logic in the database and maintain a consistent data access policy to reduce the risk of accidental data leakage. (For details, see “Limiting access to data using Row-Level Security.”)

Figure 4: Row-Level Security

figure-4

  • Dynamic Data Masking (DDM) lets you conceal your sensitive data or personally identifiable information (PII) such as customer phone number, bank information or Social Security number. DDM and RLS help developers build applications that require restricted direct access to certain data as a means of preventing users from seeing specific information. Figure 5 illustrates. (For deeper information, see “Use Dynamic Data Masking to obfuscate your sensitive data.”)

Figure 5: Dynamic Data Masking

figure-5

To learn more about SQL Server 2016 security, you can visit the SQL Server data security webpage and read the security white paper.

Windows Server 2016 security

Just as SQL Server 2016 provides advanced security features that are not available in other data platforms, Windows Server 2016 includes built-in breach-resistance mechanisms to establish strong security layers to help thwart attacks.

The Windows Server 2016 operating system is a strategic layer in your infrastructure and serves as the foundation for your SQL Server data security. To prevent data exposure, you need the most advanced protection you can get. By modernizing both your server platform and your data platform together, you can be assured you’re doing your best to protect your business. The security functionality in Windows Server 2016 includes the following:

  • Device Guard helps lock down what runs on the server so that you are better protected from unauthorized software running on the same server as your SQL Server application.
  • Credential Guard to protect SQL Server admin credentials from being stolen by Pass-the-Hash and Pass-the-Ticket attacks. Using an entirely new isolated Local Security Authority (LSA) process, which is not accessible to the rest of the operating system, Credential Guard’s virtualization-based security isolates credential information to prevent interception of password hashes or Kerberos tickets.
  • Control Flow Guard and Windows Defender protect against known and unknown vulnerabilities that malware can otherwise exploit. Control Flow tightly restricts what application code can be executed — especially indirect call instructions. Lightweight security checks identify the set of functions in the application that are valid targets for indirect calls. When an application runs, it verifies that these indirect call targets are valid. Windows Defender works hand-in-hand with Device Guard and Control Flow Guard to prevent malicious code of any kind from being installed on your servers.

To learn more about the advanced layers of OS security, visit the Windows Server security webpage and read the white paper.

Thanks for reading our first blog in the series. For more info, check out this summary of five reasons to run SQL Server 2016 with Windows Server 2016.

Ready to give it a try? Here are some options to get started:

Windows Server Virtual Labs

Windows Server 2016 Free Evaluation

SQL Server 2016 Free Evaluation

SQL Server Virtual Labs


[1] “Data Breach Costs Rising, Now $4 Million per Incident”

[2] National Institute of Standards and Technology Comprehensive Vulnerability Database, update 2016

[3] National Institute of Standards and Technology Comprehensive Vulnerability Database, update 2016

[4] National Institute of Standards and Technology Comprehensive Vulnerability Database, update 2016



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terça-feira, 21 de março de 2017

How to do a LOOP on Oracle PL\SQL

On SQL SERVER a cursor, althought not the best solution, is a resource that I seldonly end up using. Sou how to do it in ORACLE?

Here is a simple example:

CREATE TABLE myloop 
  ( 
     code INTEGER, 
     name VARCHAR2(200) 
  ); 

INSERT INTO myloop 
            (code, 
             name) 
VALUES      (0, 
             'Name 1'); 

INSERT INTO myloop 
            (code, 
             name) 
VALUES      (0, 
             'Name 2'); 

DECLARE 
    nuordem NUMBER; 
BEGIN 
    nuordem := 0; 

    FOR c IN (SELECT code, 
                     name 
              FROM   myloop) LOOP 
        nuordem := nuordem + 1; 

        UPDATE myloop 
        SET    code = nuordem 
        WHERE  name = c.name; 
    END LOOP; 
END; 

/ 
SELECT * 
FROM   myloop; 


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sexta-feira, 17 de março de 2017

[From Technet] SQL Server next version CTP 1.4 now available

Microsoft is excited to announce a new preview for the next version of SQL Server (SQL Server v.Next). Community Technology Preview (CTP) 1.4 is available on both Windows and Linux. In this preview, we added the ability to schedule jobs using SQL Server Agent on Linux. You can try the preview in your choice of development and test environments now: http://ift.tt/2ggXeal.

Key CTP 1.4 enhancements

The primary enhancement to SQL Server v.Next on Linux in this release is the ability to schedule jobs using SQL Server Agent. This functionality helps administrators automate maintenance jobs and other tasks, or run them in response to an event. Some SQL Server Agent functionality is not yet enabled for SQL Server on Linux. To learn more and see sample SQL Server Agent jobs, you can read our detailed blog titled “SQL Server on Linux: Running scheduled jobs with SQL Server Agent” or attend an Engineering Town Hall about “SQL Server Agent and Full Text Search in SQL Server on Linux.”

The mssql-server-linux container image on Docker Hub now includes the sqlcmd and bcp command line utilities to make it easier to create and attach databases and automate other actions when working with containers. For additional detail on CTP 1.4, please visit What’s New in SQL Server v.Next, Release Notes and Linux documentation.

In addition, SQL Server Analysis Services and SQL Server Reporting Services developer tools now support Visual Studio 2017. They are available for installation from the Visual Studio Marketplace providing the option for automatic updates going forward.

Get SQL Server v.Next CTP 1.4 today!

Try the preview of the next release of SQL Server today! Get started with the preview of SQL Server with our developer tutorials that show you how to install and use SQL Server v.Next on macOS, Docker, Windows, and Linux and quickly build an app in a programming language of your choice.

Have questions? Join the discussion of SQL Server v.Next at MSDN. If you run into an issue or would like to make a suggestion, you can let us know through Connect. We look forward to hearing from you!



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[From Technet] SQL Server on Linux: Running jobs with SQL Server Agent

In keeping with our goal to enable SQL Server features across all platforms supported by SQL Server, Microsoft is excited to announce the preview of SQL Server Agent on Linux in SQL Server vNext Community Technology Preview (CTP) 1.4.

SQL Server Agent is a component that executes scheduled administrative tasks, called “jobs.” Jobs contain one or more job steps. Each step contains its own task such as backing up a database. SQL Server Agent can run a job on a schedule, in response to a specific event, or on demand. For example, if you want to back up all the company databases every weekday after hours, you can automate doing so by scheduling an Agent job to run a backup at 22:00 Monday through Friday.

We have released SQL Server Agent packages for Ubuntu, RedHat Enterprise Linux, and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server that you can install via apt-get, yum, and zypper. Once you install these packages, you can create T-SQL Jobs using SSMS, sqlcmd, and other GUI and command line tools.

Here is a simple example:

  • Create a job

CREATE DATABASE SampleDB ;

USE msdb ;

GO

EXEC dbo.sp_add_job

@job_name = N’Daily SampleDB Backup’ ;

GO

  • Add one or more job steps

EXEC sp_add_jobstep

@job_name = N’Daily SampleDB Backup’,

@step_name = N’Backup database’,

@subsystem = N’TSQL’,

@command = N’BACKUP DATABASE SampleDB TO DISK = \

N”/var/opt/mssql/data/SampleDB.bak” WITH NOFORMAT, NOINIT, \

NAME = ”SampleDB-full”, SKIP, NOREWIND, NOUNLOAD, STATS = 10′,

@retry_attempts = 5,

@retry_interval = 5 ;

GO

  • Create a job schedule

EXEC dbo.sp_add_schedule

@schedule_name = N’Daily SampleDB’,

@freq_type = 4,

@freq_interval = 1,

@active_start_time = 233000 ;

USE msdb ;

GO

  • Attach the schedule and add the job server

EXEC sp_attach_schedule

@job_name = N’Daily SampleDB Backup’,

@schedule_name = N’Daily SampleDB’;

GO

EXEC dbo.sp_add_jobserver

@job_name = N’Daily SampleDB Backup’,

@server_name = N'(LOCAL)’;

GO

  • Start job

EXEC dbo.sp_start_job N’ Daily SampleDB Backup’ ;

GO

Limitations:

The following types of SQL Agent jobs are not currently supported on Linux:

  • Subsystems: CmdExec, PowerShell, Replication Distributor, Snapshot, Merge, Queue Reader, SSIS, SSAS, SSRS
  • Alerts
  • DB Mail
  • Log Shipping
  • Log Reader Agent
  • Change Data Capture

Get started

If you’re ready to get started with SQL Server on Linux, here’s how to install the SQL Server Agent package via apt-get, yum, and zypper. And here’s how to create your first T-SQL job and show you to use SSMS with SQL Agent.

Learn more



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quarta-feira, 15 de março de 2017

SYS.COMMENTS on ORACLE

On SQL SERVER it was kinda easy to find any object that referenced a table, column, etc... all you needed to do was to query sys.comments, and there it was. To find any reference to a "xpto" object, you could:

SELECT * 
FROM   syscomments c 
       inner join sysobjects o 
               ON c.id = o.id 
WHERE  c.text LIKE '%xpto%' 

On more recent versions of SQL SERVER, syscomments is no more, so the alternative is OBJECT_DEFINITION function:

SELECT * 
FROM   sys.procedures 
WHERE  Object_definition(object_id) LIKE '%xpto%' 

On ORACLE, you can achieve the same result using ALL_SOURCE. So if you need to finf any view, function, procedure, etc that references a table or column named "xpto", you can do this:


SELECT * 
FROM   all_source 
WHERE  text LIKE '%xpto%' 




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[From Technet] Introducing Microsoft Data Amp

This post was authored by Mitra Azizirad, Corporate Vice President, Cloud Application Development & Data Marketing, Microsoft

Today, I am excited to announce that on April 19, we will host a new online event, Microsoft Data Amp.

Microsoft Data Amp is inspired by you, our customers and partners, who everyday are transforming applications and industries by using data in innovative ways, to predict, take action and create new business opportunities. We continue to accelerate our pace of innovation to enable you to meet the demands of a dynamic marketplace and harness the incredible power of data, more securely and faster than before.

Next month at Microsoft Data Amp, Executive Vice President Scott Guthrie and Corporate Vice President Joseph Sirosh will share how Microsoft’s latest innovations put data, analytics and artificial intelligence at the heart of business transformation. The event will include exciting announcements that will help you derive even more value from the cloud, enable transformative application development, and ensure you can capitalize on intelligence from any data, any size, anywhere, across Linux and other open source technologies.

Customers and partners, in industries from healthcare to retail, will illustrate how they are innovating, evolving and reshaping their businesses by infusing data into the heart of their solutions and applications. Microsoft Data Amp will also feature demos and deep dives on new scenarios enabled by a broad array of new data and analytics technologies, from SQL Server to Azure Machine Learning.

I encourage you to save the date, and I look forward to you joining us for Microsoft Data Amp on April 19.

clip_image0016.jpg

Mitra Azizirad, Corporate Vice President, Cloud Application Development & Data Marketing, Microsoft

With an expansive technical, business and marketing background, Azizirad has led multiple and varied businesses across Microsoft for over two decades. She leads product marketing for Microsoft’s developer, data and artificial intelligence offerings spanning Visual Studio, SQL Server, Cortana Intelligence Services, .NET, Xamarin and associated Azure data, cognitive and developer services.



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quarta-feira, 8 de março de 2017

[From Technet] Gartner names Microsoft a leader in the Magic Quadrant for Data Management Solutions for Analytics (DMSA)

This post was authored by Rohan Kumar, General Manager, DS SQL Engineering.

We’re excited that Gartner has recognized Microsoft as a leader in the Magic Quadrant for Data Management Solutions for Analytics (DMSA). Gartner defines the DMSA as a system for storing, accessing, processing, and delivering data intended for one of the primary use cases that support analytics.[1] These use cases include supporting ongoing traditional, operational, logical, and context-independent data warehousing.[2] The DMSA thus represents an evolution from the traditional data warehousing approach. Although data warehousing continues to be a major use case, the DMSA encompasses new trends such as data lakes and context-independent data warehouses that enable data science uses cases.[3]

magicQuadrantDMSA

At Microsoft we have been championing a similar evolution to make big data processing and analytics simpler and more accessible to transform data into intelligent action. We do this through SQL Server 2016 and the Cortana Intelligence Suite to offer a comprehensive portfolio of solutions to do data warehousing, big data, and advanced analytics solutions. SQL Server as an example gives organizations a breadth of capabilities to do analytics on-premises, including features like real-time operational analytics, in-memory columnstore, integration with Hadoop via PolyBase, in-database analytics with R Services built in, and fast time to market with reference architectures. In the cloud, we offer Cortana Intelligence Suite, which has SQL Data Warehouse, a truly elastic, scale-out data warehouse; HDInsight, a managed Hadoop service that runs Hortonworks Data Platform; Data Lake Analytics, an on-demand analytics job service to power intelligent action; Data Lake Store, a no-limits data lake to power intelligent action; and DocumentDB, a global scale-out NoSQL service with <10ms guarantees.

In providing customers with these solutions, our goal is to help them realize the full potential of their data and give them the ability to transform their business. As an example, Tangerine uses a data warehouse on-premises with Hadoop in the cloud so that it can query relational and nonrelational data to accelerate its time to insights. With such a solution, Tangerine is looking to transform the financial services industry by building a predictive, context-aware application that gives it information based on the time and where the customer is.

We’re excited that Gartner recognized both our ability to execute and the completeness of vision by placing Microsoft in the leader’s quadrant of the Magic Quadrant for Data Management Solutions for Analytics. Gartner notes that leaders have been able to adapt rapidly to this changing market and have pursued all the primary use cases Gartner identified to support analytics.[4] The push for cloud has also affected the relative ratings among the leaders.[5] In the coming year, we will continue to focus on delivering the highest value to our customers and partners through innovations that make data warehousing, big data, and analytics even more accessible to transform data into intelligent action. You can read the full report, “Magic Quadrant for Data Management Solutions for Analytics,” here.

To learn more:


[1] Source: Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Data Management Solutions for Analytics, 2017.
[2] Source: Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Data Management Solutions for Analytics, 2017.
[3] Source: Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Data Management Solutions for Analytics, 2017.
[4] Source: Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Data Management Solutions for Analytics, 2017.
[5] Source: Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Data Management Solutions for Analytics, 2017.



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quarta-feira, 1 de março de 2017

[From Technet] Now available! SQL Server Premium Assurance provides six more years of product support

Today we are announcing general availability of SQL Server Premium Assurance, a new offering that enables flexibility to keep systems running without disruption while modernizing on your own schedule.

When you purchase Premium Assurance, you receive “critical” and “important” security updates and bulletins during the six years after the End of Extended Support. This means you can get up to 16 years of total support beginning with SQL Server 2008 and 2008 R2 versions.

To learn more about SQL Server Premium Assurance and its companion offering Windows Server Premium Assurance, visit the announcement on Hybrid Cloud blog. You can get the lowest price and lock in savings if you purchase Premium Assurance through June 2017. Prices will increase over time, so act now!



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sexta-feira, 17 de fevereiro de 2017

[From Technet] SQL Server next version CTP 1.3 now available

Microsoft is excited to announce a new preview for the next version of SQL Server (SQL Server v.Next). Community Technology Preview (CTP) 1.3 is available on both Windows and Linux. In this preview, we added several feature enhancements to High Availability and Disaster Recovery (HADR), including the ability to run Always On Availability Groups on Linux. You can try the preview in your choice of development and test environments now: http://ift.tt/2ggXeal.

Key CTP 1.3 enhancement: Always On Availability Groups on Linux

In SQL Server v.Next, we continue to add new enhancements for greater availability and higher uptime. A key design principle has been to provide customers with the same HA and DR solutions on all platforms supported by SQL Server. On Windows, Always On depends on Windows Server Failover Clustering (WSFC). On Linux, you can now create Always On Availability Groups, which integrate with Linux-based cluster resource managers to enable automatic monitoring, failure detection and automatic failover during unplanned outages. We started with the popular clustering technology, Pacemaker.

In addition, Availability Groups can now work across Windows and Linux as part of the same Distributed Availability Group. This configuration can accomplish cross-platform migrations without downtime. To learn more, you can read our blog titled “SQL Server on Linux: Mission Critical HADR with Always On Availability Groups”.

Other Enhancements

SQL Server v.Next CTP 1.3 also includes these additional feature enhancements:

  • Full text search is now available for all supported Linux distributions.
  • Resumable online index rebuilds enables users to recover more easily from interruption of index builds, or split an index build across maintenance windows.
  • Temporal Tables Retention Policy support enables customers to more easily manage the amount of historical data retained by temporal tables.
  • Indirect checkpoint performance improvements. Indirect checkpoint is the recommended configuration for large databases and for SQL Server 2016, and now it will be even more performant in SQL Server v.Next.
  • Minimum Replica Commit Availability Groups setting enables users to set the minimum number of replicas that are required to commit a transaction before committing on the primary.
  • For SQL Server v.Next technical preview running on Windows Server, encoding hints in SQL Server Analysis Services is an advanced feature to help optimize refresh times with no impact on query performance.

For additional detail on CTP 1.3, please visit What’s New in SQL Server v.Next, Release Notes and Linux documentation.

Get SQL Server v.Next CTP 1.3 today!

Try the preview of the next release of SQL Server today! Get started with the preview of SQL Server with our developer tutorials that show you how to install and use SQL Server v.Next on macOS, Docker, Windows and Linux and quickly build an app in a programming language of your choice.

Have questions? Join the discussion of SQL Server v.Next at MSDN. If you run into an issue or would like to make a suggestion, you can let us know through Connect. We look forward to hearing from you!



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[From Technet] SQL Server on Linux: Mission-critical HADR with Always On Availability Groups

This post was authored by Mihaela Blendea, Senior Program Manager, SQL Server

In keeping with our goal to enable the same High Availability and Disaster Recovery solutions on all platforms supported by SQL Server, today Microsoft is excited to announce the preview of Always On Availability Groups for Linux in SQL Server v.Next Community Technology Preview (CTP) 1.3. This technology adds to the HADR options available for SQL Server on Linux, having previously enabled shared disk failover cluster instance capabilities.

First released with SQL Server 2012 and enhanced in the 2014 and 2016 releases, Always On Availability Groups is SQL Server’s flagship solution for HADR. It provides High Availability for groups of databases on top of direct attached storage, supporting multiple active secondary replicas for integrated HA/DR, automatic failure detection, fast transparent failover, and read load balancing. This broad set of capabilities is enabling customers to meet the strictest availability SLA requirements for their mission- critical workloads.

Here is an overview of the scenarios that Always On Availability Groups are enabling for SQL Server v.Next:

Run mission-critical application using SQL Server running on Linux

Always On Availability Groups make it easy for your applications to meet rigorous business continuity requirements. This feature is now available on all Linux OS distributions SQL Server v.Next supports — Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Ubuntu and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. Also, all capabilities that make Availability Groups a flexible, integrated and efficient HADR solution are available on Linux as well:

  • Multidatabase failover – an availability group supports a failover environment for a set of user databases, known as availability databases.
  • Fast failure detection and failover – as a resource in a highly available cluster, an availability group benefits from built-in cluster intelligence for immediate failover detection and failover action.
  • Transparent failover using availability group listener – enables client to use single connection string to primary or secondary databases that does not change in case of failover.
  • Multiple sync/async secondary replicas – an availability group supports up to eight secondary replicas. The availability mode determines whether the primary replica waits (synchronous replica) or not (asynchronous replica) to commit transactions on a database until a given secondary replica has written the transaction log records to disk.
  • Manual/automatic failover with no data loss – failover to a synchronized secondary replica can be triggered automatically by the cluster or on demand by the database administrator.
  • Active secondary replicas available for read/backup workloads – one or more secondary replicas can be configured to support read-only access to secondary databases and/or to permit backups on secondary databases.
  • Automatic seeding – SQL Server automatically creates the secondary replicas for every database in the availability group.
  • Read-only routing – SQL Server routes incoming connections to an availability group listener to a secondary replica that is configured to allow read-only workloads.
  • Database level health monitoring and failover trigger – enhanced database-level monitoring and diagnostics.
  • Disaster Recovery configurations – with Distributed Availability Groups or multisubnet availability group setup.

Here is an illustration of a HADR configuration that an enterprise building a mission-critical application using SQL Server running on Linux can use to achieve: application-level protection (two synchronized secondary replicas), compliance with business continuity regulations (DR replica on remote site) as well as enhance performance (offload reporting and backup workloads to active secondary replicas):

clip_image002

Fig. 1 Always On Availability Groups as an Integrated and Flexible HADR Solution on Linux

On Windows, Always On depends on Windows Server Failover Cluster (WSFC) for distributed metadata storage, failure detection and failover orchestration. On Linux, we are enabling Availability Groups to integrate natively with your choice of clustering technology. For example, in preview today SQL Server v.Next integrates with Pacemaker, a popular Linux clustering technology. Users can add a previously configured SQL Server Availability Group as a resource to a Pacemaker cluster and all the orchestration regarding monitoring, failure detection and failover is taken care of. To achieve this, customers will use the SQL Server Resource Agent for Pacemaker available with the mssql-server-ha package, that is installed alongside mssql-server.

Workload load balancing for increased scale and performance

Previously, users had to set up a cluster to load balance read workloads for their application using readable secondary replicas. Configuring and operating a cluster implied a lot of manageability overhead, if HA was not the goal.

Users can now create a group of replicated databases and leverage the fastest replication technology for SQL Server to offload secondary read-only workloads from the primary replica. If the goal is to conserve resources for mission-critical workloads running on the primary, users can now use read-only routing or directly connect to readable secondary replicas, without depending on integration with any clustering technology. These new capabilities are available for SQL Server running on both Windows and Linux platforms.

clip_image008

Fig. 2 Group of Read-Only Replicated Databases to Load Balance Read-Only Workloads

Note this is not a high-availability setup, as there is no “fabric” to monitor and coordinate failure detection and automatic failover. For users who need HADR capabilities, we recommend they use a cluster manager (WSFC on Windows or Pacemaker on Linux).

Seamless cross-platform migration

By setting up a cross-platform Distributed Availability Group, users can do a live migration of their SQL Server workloads from Windows to Linux or vice versa. We do not recommend running in this configuration in a steady state as there is no cluster manager for cross-platform orchestration, but it is the fastest solution for a cross-platform migration with minimum downtime.

clip_image010

Fig. 3 Cross-Platform Live Migration Using Distributed Availability Groups

Please visit our reference documentation on business continuity for SQL Server on Linux for more specifics on how integration with Pacemaker clustering is achieved in all supported OS flavors and end-to-end functional samples.

Today’s announcement marks the first preview of new Always On Availability Groups capabilities: Linux platform support for HADR as well as new scenarios like creating a cluster-independent group of replicated databases for offloading read-only traffic. Availability Groups are available on all platforms and OS versions that SQL Server v.Next is running on. In upcoming releases, we are going to enhance these capabilities by providing high-availability solutions for containerized environments as well as tooling support for an integrated experience. Stay tuned!

Get started

You can get started with many of these capabilities today:

Learn more



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